Pastoral PE

Claire Fulton treats herself to a day out of town, one that starts with a farm breakfast under Lady’s Slipper Mountain. It ends with the best venison pies and a jug of fresh honey, but there’s plenty in between

With a Monarch butterfly flying jaggedly past my windscreen on the breath of a crisp day, I could not have picked a finer morning for a country drive from Port Elizabeth.

PE Artist
Port Elizabeth artist Paul Munro observing and recording botanical structures at the summit of Lady’s Slipper Mountain.

 

It is said that the best memories come from some old dirt road so I am headed out on the N2, for breakfast at Falcon Rock Country Restaurant tucked under Lady’s Slipper Mountain – some 30km west of Port Elizabeth.

I swing off at the Van Stadens/Uitenhage turn-off, right under the freeway and then follow the signs to Falcon Rock. It’s a boma-style recreation of a typical outpost patronised by wagons in the 1800s on their journey from Cape Town, through Van Staden’s Gorge to the big-game hunting fields of old Africa.

At play in PE
Georgia-Mae Gradwell plays in the fairytale garden at Falcon Rock country restaurant.

 

The distinctive, upside-down, lady’s shoe rock formation here was used as a landmark to guide the wagoners to the pass, the watering spots and the suitable outspan sites. But today it guides me to my coffee.

Nothing spells ‘country’ more than a doe-eyed cow or a cocky rooster with hens and, sure enough, my companion and I are greeted at the rustic establishment by a shiny-plumed cockerel and his brood. Owners Genie and Rolf Hüttenrauch join us for an English breakfast at the indoor restaurant from where we can admire the dappled light of the garden under old sweet thorn trees.

The revolutionary Crossways Farm Village in Thornhill merges village living of yesteryear with modern conveniences.
The revolutionary Crossways Farm Village in Thornhill merges village living of yesteryear with modern conveniences.

 

Rolf, a former gunsmith from Germany, is president of the Historical Firearm Association of South Africa and boasts a private collection that includes an 1848 Monkey Tail rifle (which uses a paper combustible cartridge) favoured by the Boers and an 1872 British Snider-Enfield breech loading rifle. […]

Read the full story in the June 2015 edition of Country Life, available as a digital downloadCover

 

 

 

 

 

 

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